QUINN COMMUNITY OUTREACH CORPORATION

25400 Alessandro Blvd., Suite 101

Moreno Valley CA 92553

website: qcoc.org

951-570-0043

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© 2016 by Quinn Community Outreach Corporation

Breast Cancer Awareness

Know The Risk Factors:

 

Nobody knows for certain why some women develop breast cancer and others do not.

 

What is known:

 

  • Gender:  Simply being a woman is the main risk factor for developing breast cancer. The main reason women develop more breast cancer is because their breast cells are constantly exposed to the growth-promoting effects of the female hormones estrogen and progesterone.

  • Age:  Your risk of developing breast cancer increases as you get older. About 1 out of 8 invasive breast cancers are found in women younger than 45, while about 2 out of 3 invasive breast cancers are found in women age 55 or older.

  • Personal History of Breast Cancer:  A woman who had breast cancer in one breast has an increased risk of getting cancer in the other breast or in another part of the same breast.

  • Family History of Breast Cancer:  The risk is higher among women whose close blood realtives have this disease. (mother, sister or daughter)

  • Dense Breast Tissue:  Women with denser breast tissue (as seen on a mammogram) have more glandular tissue and less faty tissue, and a higher risk of breast cancer. 

  • Certain Benign Breast Conditions:  Women who started menstruating at an early age (before age 12) and/or went through menopause at a later age (after age 55) have a slightly higher risk of breast cancer. 

  • Not Having Children or Having Them Later in Life:  Women who have had no children or who had their first child after age 30 have a slightly higher breast cancer risk.

  • Lack of Physical Activity:  Physical activity in the form of exercise reduces breast cancer risk. The question is how much do you need. A study from the Women's Health Initiative found as little as 1.25 to 2.5 hours per week of brisk walking reduced a woman's risk by 18%.